Monday, April 21, 2014 Sunday, April 20, 2014
Mary Riter Hamilton
Easter Morning, La Petite Penitente, Brittany, c.1900
From the Winnipeg Art Gallery:

Mary Riter Hamilton’s intimate portrait of a peasant girl was painted while the artist was studying in Paris, around the time she first started exhibiting at the French Salon in 1905. The WAG work exalts the unique local culture of northwestern France: the supplicant holds a rosary and is seated with what is likely a prayer book at her left; the clogs testify to a hard farm life. Considered remote and deeply traditional, the French regions of Brittany and Normandy and their inhabitants were favourite subjects for earlier French painters. Hamilton returned to Canada in 1906 and settled in Winnipeg. Shortly thereafter, she mounted an exhibition of her Paris paintings and sketches in private residences and galleries in Winnipeg and Toronto; Easter Morning was considered her exhibition’s masterpiece.

Mary Riter Hamilton

Easter Morning, La Petite Penitente, Brittany, c.1900

From the Winnipeg Art Gallery:

Mary Riter Hamilton’s intimate portrait of a peasant girl was painted while the artist was studying in Paris, around the time she first started exhibiting at the French Salon in 1905. The WAG work exalts the unique local culture of northwestern France: the supplicant holds a rosary and is seated with what is likely a prayer book at her left; the clogs testify to a hard farm life. Considered remote and deeply traditional, the French regions of Brittany and Normandy and their inhabitants were favourite subjects for earlier French painters. Hamilton returned to Canada in 1906 and settled in Winnipeg. Shortly thereafter, she mounted an exhibition of her Paris paintings and sketches in private residences and galleries in Winnipeg and Toronto; Easter Morning was considered her exhibition’s masterpiece.

(Source: wag.ca)

Silas Kayakjuak (Qayaqjuaq)

Family Gathering Eggs, n.d.

(Source: spiritwrestler.com)

Saturday, April 19, 2014
Mina dela Cruz
Empty Nest, n.d.

Mina dela Cruz

Empty Nest, n.d.

(Source: minadelacruz.com)

Pudlo Pudlat
Running Rabbit, 1963
~
Hope everyone has a wonderful Easter weekend and enjoys some time off work (or at least getting some extra money if you’re stuck working)

Pudlo Pudlat

Running Rabbit, 1963

~

Hope everyone has a wonderful Easter weekend and enjoys some time off work (or at least getting some extra money if you’re stuck working)

(Source: gallery.ca)

artgalleryofontario:

Model Totem Pole, c. 1890-1905Edenshaw, Charles(Attributed to)ArgilliteOverall: 21 x 4.7 x 5.8 cmGift of Roy G. Cole, Rosseau, Ontario, 1997© 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

artgalleryofontario:

Model Totem Pole, c. 1890-1905
Edenshaw, Charles(Attributed to)
Argillite
Overall: 21 x 4.7 x 5.8 cm
Gift of Roy G. Cole, Rosseau, Ontario, 1997
© 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

artgalleryofontario:

[Aboriginal Woman and Child, Yale B.C.], c. 1888Notman, William & SonAlbumen printOverall: 18.2 x 23.5 cmPurchase, donated funds in memory of Eric Steiner, 2005© 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

artgalleryofontario:

[Aboriginal Woman and Child, Yale B.C.], c. 1888
Notman, William & Son
Albumen print
Overall: 18.2 x 23.5 cm
Purchase, donated funds in memory of Eric Steiner, 2005
© 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

Rosemary Gilliat Eaton
Teenage boy, three young boys and one little girl pet a rabbit, 1954

Rosemary Gilliat Eaton

Teenage boy, three young boys and one little girl pet a rabbit, 1954

(Source: collectionscanada.gc.ca)

Friday, April 18, 2014
Gerald Trottier
Good Friday, 1963
~

"I don’t refer to Canadian landscape as such, but to landscape generally. After all, as every artist has realized, the significance of nature does not lie in its physical properties, but in its spiritual ones.”

Gerald Trottier

Good Friday, 1963

~

"I don’t refer to Canadian landscape as such, but to landscape generally. After all, as every artist has realized, the significance of nature does not lie in its physical properties, but in its spiritual ones.”

(Source: gallery.ca)

Chief Henry Speck/Ozistalis
Father Forgive Them, 1964

Chief Henry Speck/Ozistalis

Father Forgive Them, 1964

(Source: vancouverartinthesixties.com)

I don’t like modernism. I don’t like what it’s done. It’s been a very oppressive agenda. But I don’t think it should be finished with. I totally distrust the people who are celebrating its death and at the same time celebrating a new style which is recognizably postmodern. If we say that modernism is an agenda, postmodernism has to be a situation, not an agenda. So the situation has to include everything that the agenda did not include. The agenda goes away, therefore everything is there. That’s what the New York art world is saying that it does but it doesn’t do that. There are postmodernist styles and there are enforced postmodernist styles, that’s just modernism, that’s just continuing the agenda. However, modernism can be very useful as a cultural tool for moving into the world in a better way. I think that Kay Walkingstick is a good example of that. I think her work is very valuable, because she’s a very good modernist painter. And we as Indians need that. We need that as a way to free up things, in a way that my work doesn’t necessarily do for us. And certainly the different Indian art schools that have developed in the last twenty years all lock you into a stereotype of modern art, of a way of being. They are very informative, these Indian styles. They inform people how to be Indian and that’s very dangerous.

Jimmie Durham interviewed by Susan Canning (1998)

If art becomes a way for understanding ourselves and understanding how we can be, we should demand more of art. I am for an Indigenous art that is aware of its reality, that through colonialism, our art has become a tool of their discourse about us.

(via in-kind-negotiations)