Wednesday, April 23, 2014
William Kuhnley
Seamonster Fin, n.d.
~
From Spirit Wrestler Gallery:

Bill Kuhnley was born in 1967 in Seattle, Washington, and soon after the family relocated to the western shore of Vancouver Island. He is a member of the Ditidaht tribe of the Nuu-chah-nulth nation. He grew up surrounded by carving produced by his parents, William and Josephine Kuhnley. He began carving at the age of thirteen. He left school at sixteen to work in his parents cedar salvage business and spent the next seven years working in the bush. He began carving seriously in 1991 and was offered a position the same year with the Duncan Heritage Center in Duncan, B.C.

He applied for an apprenticeship under Robert Davidson and was accepted in 1994. He was one of four apprentices honoured by Robert Davidson at the “Stone Maul” ceremony where each apprentice was given a Stone Maul as a symbol of their achievements.

William Kuhnley

Seamonster Fin, n.d.

~

From Spirit Wrestler Gallery:

Bill Kuhnley was born in 1967 in Seattle, Washington, and soon after the family relocated to the western shore of Vancouver Island. He is a member of the Ditidaht tribe of the Nuu-chah-nulth nation. He grew up surrounded by carving produced by his parents, William and Josephine Kuhnley. He began carving at the age of thirteen. He left school at sixteen to work in his parents cedar salvage business and spent the next seven years working in the bush. He began carving seriously in 1991 and was offered a position the same year with the Duncan Heritage Center in Duncan, B.C.

He applied for an apprenticeship under Robert Davidson and was accepted in 1994. He was one of four apprentices honoured by Robert Davidson at the “Stone Maul” ceremony where each apprentice was given a Stone Maul as a symbol of their achievements.

(Source: spiritwrestler.com)

Tracey McLaren, Something Right (2008)

Daniel’s lost custody of his kids. But he paints hard and with passion so his daughter can say, “My dad’s an artist.”

(Source: wapikoni.ca)

cuartgallery:

Upcoming Exhibition at CUAG: Inuit Art: Skin Deep
Curated by Lisa Truong
May 12 - August 10, 2014
Skin Deep explores the enormous importance of skins and skin clothing in Inuit culture, past and present. In Inuit narratives, skin is something that can be worn, shed, and manipulated. People tattoo their own skin to affirm personal and cultural identities, and wear clothing made from animal skins for aesthetic adornment and protection from the elements. Skin Deep features the tools used to hunt animals and prepare their skins; prints, drawings, and sculptures depicting stories and objects in which skin plays a central role; and objects made from skin, such as mitts and boots. The exhibition includes the work of artists like Ningeokuluk Teevee, Jessie Oonark, Arnaqu Ashevak, and Helen Kalvak.
Image: Jessie Oonark (1906 – 1985), Tattooed Faces (1960). Stonecut on paper, ed. 9/50, Carleton University Art Gallery: Gift of Drew and Carolle Anne Armour, 2009. Photo by Patrick Lacasse.

cuartgallery:

Upcoming Exhibition at CUAG: Inuit Art: Skin Deep

Curated by Lisa Truong

May 12 - August 10, 2014

Skin Deep explores the enormous importance of skins and skin clothing in Inuit culture, past and present. In Inuit narratives, skin is something that can be worn, shed, and manipulated. People tattoo their own skin to affirm personal and cultural identities, and wear clothing made from animal skins for aesthetic adornment and protection from the elements. Skin Deep features the tools used to hunt animals and prepare their skins; prints, drawings, and sculptures depicting stories and objects in which skin plays a central role; and objects made from skin, such as mitts and boots. The exhibition includes the work of artists like Ningeokuluk Teevee, Jessie Oonark, Arnaqu Ashevak, and Helen Kalvak.

Image: Jessie Oonark (1906 – 1985), Tattooed Faces (1960). Stonecut on paper, ed. 9/50, Carleton University Art Gallery: Gift of Drew and Carolle Anne Armour, 2009. Photo by Patrick Lacasse.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Peter Rindisbacher
A Halfcast with his Wife and Child, c.1825

Peter Rindisbacher

A Halfcast with his Wife and Child, c.1825

(Source: wag.ca)

Thomas Harold Beament
Departure for the Hunt, c.1948
~
From Pegasus Gallery of Canadian Art:

After retiring from the navy in 1947, Beament embarked upon a journey to live with and study Inuit peoples of Baffin Island. Along with Lawren Harris and A. Y. Jackson, he was one of the first artists to explore the Arctic, the Inuit people and their culture. It was during these trips that Beament produced the work for which he is most famous and introduced Canadians to a people that were happy living in some of the most remote locations on Earth. In 1955, he was honoured to design a ten-cent stamp with Inuit figures for Canada Post. The drawings and paintings he made at this time of the area and its people are regarded among his greatest works of art.  

Departure for the Hunt recognizes a valuable time in the life cycle of the North—the excitement of the day, the dangers of the bay, and the beauty of its rhythms.  Unlike Harris and Jackson, on the Arctic trips Beament saw a fragile culture and focused more on the interplay of the characters than on the grandness of the landscape. It is there as well, but as an awesome backdrop as opposed to the focal point. The warmer yellow tones play on the feeling of the moment as opposed to the bleakness of the landscape. Beament would have seen a time when the Canadian military Operation Musk-Ox had just been completed (1946). The high North was now changing from the centuries old behavioural patterns to modernisation due to new accessibility. Overall, this silkscreen is a highly composed final homage to Northern life. 

Thomas Harold Beament

Departure for the Hunt, c.1948

~

From Pegasus Gallery of Canadian Art:

After retiring from the navy in 1947, Beament embarked upon a journey to live with and study Inuit peoples of Baffin Island. Along with Lawren Harris and A. Y. Jackson, he was one of the first artists to explore the Arctic, the Inuit people and their culture. It was during these trips that Beament produced the work for which he is most famous and introduced Canadians to a people that were happy living in some of the most remote locations on Earth. In 1955, he was honoured to design a ten-cent stamp with Inuit figures for Canada Post. The drawings and paintings he made at this time of the area and its people are regarded among his greatest works of art.  

Departure for the Hunt recognizes a valuable time in the life cycle of the North—the excitement of the day, the dangers of the bay, and the beauty of its rhythms.  Unlike Harris and Jackson, on the Arctic trips Beament saw a fragile culture and focused more on the interplay of the characters than on the grandness of the landscape. It is there as well, but as an awesome backdrop as opposed to the focal point. The warmer yellow tones play on the feeling of the moment as opposed to the bleakness of the landscape. Beament would have seen a time when the Canadian military Operation Musk-Ox had just been completed (1946). The high North was now changing from the centuries old behavioural patterns to modernisation due to new accessibility. Overall, this silkscreen is a highly composed final homage to Northern life. 

(Source: sampsonmatthewsprints.com)

Monday, April 21, 2014
Louis-Philippe Hébert
Algonquins, 1917

Louis-Philippe Hébert

Algonquins, 1917

(Source: mbam.qc.ca)

Tania Willard
Hiawatha Indian Insane Asylum, 2007

Tania Willard

Hiawatha Indian Insane Asylum, 2007

Sunday, April 20, 2014
Mary Riter Hamilton
Easter Morning, La Petite Penitente, Brittany, c.1900
From the Winnipeg Art Gallery:

Mary Riter Hamilton’s intimate portrait of a peasant girl was painted while the artist was studying in Paris, around the time she first started exhibiting at the French Salon in 1905. The WAG work exalts the unique local culture of northwestern France: the supplicant holds a rosary and is seated with what is likely a prayer book at her left; the clogs testify to a hard farm life. Considered remote and deeply traditional, the French regions of Brittany and Normandy and their inhabitants were favourite subjects for earlier French painters. Hamilton returned to Canada in 1906 and settled in Winnipeg. Shortly thereafter, she mounted an exhibition of her Paris paintings and sketches in private residences and galleries in Winnipeg and Toronto; Easter Morning was considered her exhibition’s masterpiece.

Mary Riter Hamilton

Easter Morning, La Petite Penitente, Brittany, c.1900

From the Winnipeg Art Gallery:

Mary Riter Hamilton’s intimate portrait of a peasant girl was painted while the artist was studying in Paris, around the time she first started exhibiting at the French Salon in 1905. The WAG work exalts the unique local culture of northwestern France: the supplicant holds a rosary and is seated with what is likely a prayer book at her left; the clogs testify to a hard farm life. Considered remote and deeply traditional, the French regions of Brittany and Normandy and their inhabitants were favourite subjects for earlier French painters. Hamilton returned to Canada in 1906 and settled in Winnipeg. Shortly thereafter, she mounted an exhibition of her Paris paintings and sketches in private residences and galleries in Winnipeg and Toronto; Easter Morning was considered her exhibition’s masterpiece.

(Source: wag.ca)

Silas Kayakjuak (Qayaqjuaq)

Family Gathering Eggs, n.d.

(Source: spiritwrestler.com)

Saturday, April 19, 2014
Mina dela Cruz
Empty Nest, n.d.

Mina dela Cruz

Empty Nest, n.d.

(Source: minadelacruz.com)

Pudlo Pudlat
Running Rabbit, 1963
~
Hope everyone has a wonderful Easter weekend and enjoys some time off work (or at least getting some extra money if you’re stuck working)

Pudlo Pudlat

Running Rabbit, 1963

~

Hope everyone has a wonderful Easter weekend and enjoys some time off work (or at least getting some extra money if you’re stuck working)

(Source: gallery.ca)