Tuesday, August 26, 2014
beatonna:

The one and only Alex Colville.  An exhibit at the AGO I am sure to visit, and am proud to say my good friend Penelope Smart worked on.  He’s a legend.

beatonna:

The one and only Alex Colville.  An exhibit at the AGO I am sure to visit, and am proud to say my good friend Penelope Smart worked on.  He’s a legend.

Joseph Aglukkaq
Grandmother’s String Game, 1990

Joseph Aglukkaq

Grandmother’s String Game, 1990

(Source: wag.ca)

Monday, August 25, 2014
Wim Blom
Loaf of Bread, 2010

Wim Blom

Loaf of Bread, 2010

(Source: iantangallery.com)

Sunday, August 24, 2014
John Nobrega
Miracle (Sacred Cow), 2000

John Nobrega

Miracle (Sacred Cow), 2000

(Source: concretecontemporaryart.waddingtons.ca)

Saturday, August 23, 2014
Steve Driscoll
From the Heavens, 2009

Steve Driscoll

From the Heavens, 2009

(Source: concretecontemporaryart.waddingtons.ca)

Friday, August 22, 2014
David Pirrie
Mt Alberta, 2014
From Ian Tan Gallery:

Because of the bright, poppy monochrome colouring and use of opaque dots, our gallery coined the phrase “Pop Art Mountains”. Pop Art icon Andy Warhol would use images of celebrities and put them in a picture, idealizing, romanticizing and de-contextualizing them and their work, only leaving their larger-than life image present for the consumer to consume. Along with artists like Lichtenstein, Warhol would use bright colours, repetition and textile-like patterning. David is in a sense doing this to his mountains. By taking the mountain out of the context of landscape he is creating a monument to this specific mountain as if there were something special about it that elevates it above all the other mountains.
Pirrie further de-contextualizes the mountain by reinforcing the notion that this painting is not in any way meant to be illusory, but is meant to represent a mountain that David himself has climbed, pointing to its existence as a real mountain, not simply a picture of one. He draws attention to the point at which he cut the mountain away from its surroundings, levitating it like a 3 dimensional object in a computer program. At this hard line paint drips down the canvas, a self-reflexive technique, reminding the viewer of the hand-made aspect of representational painting. Furthermore, the drips refer back to the erosion process, the aspect of slow change over the life of the mountain. The opaque or translucent dots are applied over top of the mountains to draw attention to the picture plane, making it look like the dots are hovering over a floating mountain. By bringing the colour of the background into the immediate foreground via the dots, perspective is skewed, situating the mountains within and without the picture plane.
The paintings are a form of cataloging for David. He has conquered each of these goliaths and the simple act of painting them is a form of scientific inquiry. He is mapping these mountains for his own personal sense of understanding and as a testament to their existence in temporal space. For this latest painting David uses an opaque pink, the colour used in topographic maps to delineate mountainous and glaciated zones.

David Pirrie

Mt Alberta, 2014

From Ian Tan Gallery:

Because of the bright, poppy monochrome colouring and use of opaque dots, our gallery coined the phrase “Pop Art Mountains”. Pop Art icon Andy Warhol would use images of celebrities and put them in a picture, idealizing, romanticizing and de-contextualizing them and their work, only leaving their larger-than life image present for the consumer to consume. Along with artists like Lichtenstein, Warhol would use bright colours, repetition and textile-like patterning. David is in a sense doing this to his mountains. By taking the mountain out of the context of landscape he is creating a monument to this specific mountain as if there were something special about it that elevates it above all the other mountains.

Pirrie further de-contextualizes the mountain by reinforcing the notion that this painting is not in any way meant to be illusory, but is meant to represent a mountain that David himself has climbed, pointing to its existence as a real mountain, not simply a picture of one. He draws attention to the point at which he cut the mountain away from its surroundings, levitating it like a 3 dimensional object in a computer program. At this hard line paint drips down the canvas, a self-reflexive technique, reminding the viewer of the hand-made aspect of representational painting. Furthermore, the drips refer back to the erosion process, the aspect of slow change over the life of the mountain. The opaque or translucent dots are applied over top of the mountains to draw attention to the picture plane, making it look like the dots are hovering over a floating mountain. By bringing the colour of the background into the immediate foreground via the dots, perspective is skewed, situating the mountains within and without the picture plane.

The paintings are a form of cataloging for David. He has conquered each of these goliaths and the simple act of painting them is a form of scientific inquiry. He is mapping these mountains for his own personal sense of understanding and as a testament to their existence in temporal space. For this latest painting David uses an opaque pink, the colour used in topographic maps to delineate mountainous and glaciated zones.

(Source: iantangallery.com)

Thursday, August 21, 2014 Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Jacques Leblond de Latour
St. Michael Slaying the Dragon, c.1695-1705

Jacques Leblond de Latour

St. Michael Slaying the Dragon, c.1695-1705

(Source: mnbaq.org)

semioticapocalypse:

Richard Harrington. Theresie, three-year-old daughter of Erkuaktok (Iquugaqtuq), a Pelly Bay (Arvilikjuaq) Inuk, standing next to a snowman carved by her father. 1951
[::SemAp FB || SemAp::]

SO CUTE

semioticapocalypse:

Richard Harrington. Theresie, three-year-old daughter of Erkuaktok (Iquugaqtuq), a Pelly Bay (Arvilikjuaq) Inuk, standing next to a snowman carved by her father. 1951

[::SemAp FB || SemAp::]

SO CUTE

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Emily Carr

The Crazy Stair (The Crooked Staircase), c.1928-1930

Figure at Mimquimlees, c.1928

Indian Community House, 1912

(Source: heffel.com)

icanwonder:

I’m getting fibe TV and PVR with my internet package in the fall and for some reason that makes me feel extraordinarily adult-like.

I hear you. My new place has a shed and I feel so sophisticated and grown up. 

Monday, August 18, 2014
Kevin Schmidt
Fog Studies, 2004

Kevin Schmidt

Fog Studies, 2004

(Source: catrionajeffries.com)

Sunday, August 17, 2014
Paul-Émile Borduas
L’idole aux signes, 1950

Paul-Émile Borduas

L’idole aux signes, 1950

(Source: artsy.net)

Franklin H. Carmichael 
White Falls, c.1950

Franklin H. Carmichael 

White Falls, c.1950

(Source: sampsonmatthewsprints.com)